Good Day/Bad Day

 

Summary of this person-centered thinking tool

This involves gathering information about what makes a good day and what makes a bad day for each pupil. Then, by asking specific questions, we can use this information to begin to understand what is important to a pupil and learn how best to support them in school.

Good day/bad day

Benefits for pupils

  • Enables pupils to think about what makes a good day and bad day for them in school.
  • This information can be used to start a one-page profile.
  • Helps pupils to understand what is important to them in school and what makes them a better learner.
  • Supports pupils’ sense of belonging within the school setting as staff are listening to them and supporting them to have more good days.

Benefits for parents

  • Enables parents to think about what makes a good day and bad day for their child in school and possibly identify any further contribution they could make to support their child to have more good days.
  • Helps parents to understand what is important to their child in school.
  • Reassurance that staff in school have a better understanding of their child and what impacts on their day in school.
  • Supports positive relationships with school.

Benefits for school staff and teams

  • Enables staff to think about what makes a good day and bad day for the pupil in school and what their role is in creating the best learning days.
  • Helps staff to understand what is important to the pupil in school and how this information can be harnessed to make learning effective and maximise progress.
  • Helps the staff to think about any changes that could be made to how the classroom or the school day is arranged or how lessons are organised in response to the comments of the whole class.
  • Could be used with the whole class to help everyone appreciate what makes a good day and a bad day for their friends in school.
  • When used with the school staff team it could act as a way of knowing how best to support each other as colleagues.
  • Could be used to collate responses and create school rules or class rules specific to each cohort.
  • Could be used to inform additional support work, such as Individual Education Plans (IEPs).
  • Could be used to develop strategies within school. For example, if children were saying a bad day related to break times, staff could establish strategies to address this such as providing structured games or clubs. Likewise, if children were saying a good day was when they went outside to learn, more such opportunities could be provided.

Benefits for others

  • Could be used with Governors as a way of learning how best to work together as a team with a common goal of supporting and developing the school.
  • When children attend after-school clubs or lunch time clubs, this could be used to find out how best to run sessions and support the pupils.
  • Demonstrates that the school listens and responds to its community.