Home » Partner Blogs » Norris Bank Primary School – Tabitha Smith is the Inclusion Co-ordinator and acting Deputy Head at Norris Bank Primary School in Stockport.

 
 

Norris Bank Primary School – Tabitha Smith is the Inclusion Co-ordinator and acting Deputy Head at Norris Bank Primary School in Stockport.

 

Updating our one page profiles in school.

This week I had a lovely time working with our Year 5 and 6 children, updating and adding to their One Page Profiles.

I decided to make the format into a little booklet, with an illustrated cover and information inside.

We started with all children having a blank piece of paper, and they wrote their names at the top, in a big box. They started by writing at least 2 things that they like and admire about themselves. This prompted an interesting comment from one pupil who said ‘Isn’t that being big headed?’ So we had a useful conversation about the importance of knowing they are good at things, and feeling good about themselves. Then these pieces of paper circulated around the classroom, with everyone contributing to each others. This was lovely, with very positive comments being written.

They then read through all these positive comments and were able to share how this made them feel; appreciated and pleased and proud. Some examples are:
‘Always enthusiastic.’
‘The kindest girl in the world.’
‘A keen smiler.’
‘Funny (in a good way).’
‘A great tree climber.’

We moved on to thinking about things that were important to them. I decided to focus on five areas: People, one food, one place, one object and one place that is really important to them now. We talked about how this might change over time, and the class were interested in repeating this again later on, to see how things may change. Some examples are:
Important object: ‘Pictures of my old dog Chloe and my new dog Billy.’
Important object: ‘My blue dragon with a blue stone in it.’
Important food: ‘Lasagne.’
Important Place: ‘Whistling Sands Beach’
Important place: ‘London so I can see where my dad works.’

The last section involved how the children felt that they learned best. We spent a lot of time talking about how different people learn, and the best conditions to learn. As adults, we assume we know what children want, but sometimes we get it wrong! What I found very interesting was the fact that none of them liked the Learning Objective that we always give at the start of the lesson. They like a little bit of mystery! Or they were saying if the Learning Objective is too hard, then they switch off even before the lesson begins. There is food for thought for us as teachers on this one. Some examples are: ‘I learn best when I am organised and I have everything I need around me.’ ‘I learn best when I am in a group.’ ‘I learn best when I am with people who are as smart as me.’

Next month we are going to start exploring how we can personalise home/school agreements.